Call 0203 006 5730 / 07747 686118 or email info@carolinecarterrecruitment.com

How an Equine Apprenticeship could benefit your child

As a parent naturally you want your son/daughter to make the right moves at the right time throughout their education and transition into working life, but finding the information you need to help your son/daughter make informed decisions isn’t always easy. As specialist equine recruitment consultants, we’re passionate about the part we can play in improving the role of an equine groom as a credible career pathway. Read our top 8 considerations for parents whose children would like to pursue the possibility of becoming an Equine Apprentice.

Become an Apprentice Groom - A Parents Guide

The Grooms List team have put together a simple step-by-step guide to the process of your son/daughter becoming an Apprentice Groom, from choosing an appropriate course to finding ongoing employment once your son/daughter is a qualified Equine Groom.

The Grooms List Apprenticeships Zone - Become an Apprentice Groom - A Parents Guide - Infographic

Frequently Asked Questions

The course options, often referred to as ‘pathways’, are simple:

  • Breeding
  • Driving
  • Racing
  • Riding
  • Non-riding
  • Sporting Excellence Study Programmes

You can read more about the course options your child can choose from here.

Course levels are available for all degrees of experience with horses, starting with a “traineeship” for complete beginners, right through to Senior Groom level for more experienced equestrians. Read more about the course levels here.

For job seekers, finding and starting an Equine Apprenticeship course is fairly straightforward. Search Equine Apprenticeship vacancies on The Grooms List and start applying for suitable opportunities to make it happen. Remember that an Apprenticeship is an employment status, so the steps between applying for and starting an Equine Apprenticeship are much the same as when applying for a regular job. Read more about these steps here.

Depending on the course, equine apprenticeships usually last 12-18 months.

1. Your child will either need to attend college or will receive training within the workplace delivered directly by the Training Provider. This can vary from one or two days every 4-6 weeks to 1 in every 5 working days – speak to prospective employers and Training Providers about this. Your child must be paid for their hours at college as well as for their working hours. If the Apprenticeship course is supported by Educ8 Equine all training will be delivered within the workplace and your child will not have to travel offsite to receive this part of their training.

2. The employer must offer your child adequate work-based opportunities to learn, practice and gain experience at everything needed to achieve their qualifications. This must amount to at least 20% of the time spent at work (a minimum of 8 hours dedicated training each week).

No charges will be passed on to you or your child in return for training. The majority of Equine Apprenticeships are fully funded by the Government, and any cost incurred by an employer cannot be charged onto the Apprentice.

The minimum hourly wage an Apprentice Groom must receive varies depending on their age and the stage they are at in their apprenticeship course.

  • Aged 16-17 years an apprentice is paid £3.90 per hour (April 2019-April 2020)
  • Aged 19 and over an apprentice in their first year of an apprenticeship can be paid at least £3.90 per hour
  • Aged 19 and over an apprentice in the second year of their apprenticeship must be paid at least the National Minimum Wage for their age.

An Apprentice Groom can be paid a higher hourly rate, but this is at the discretion of the individual employer.

No. “An apprentice” is a legal employment status and the apprenticeship course must be supported by a Training Provider, and all employment laws apply to apprentices just the same as any other more experienced/established groom. Every person a yard employs must be paid an hourly rate, at least the National Minimum Wage for Apprentices or for their age. There are strict guidelines on what can be deducted from the National Minimum Wage, which you can read more about here.

Because an Apprentice is an official employed status the same laws apply as with any other job. The exception is that an Apprentice’s training must be included within the maximum hours worked, including time spent at college. The Working Time Directive sets out clear guidelines on how many hours an employee works:

  • Workers aged under 18 can’t work more than 8 hours a day or 40 hours a week and must have 2 consecutive days off work.
  • Workers aged 18 and over can’t work more than 48 hours a week on average – normally averaged over 17 weeks, and can have one full day off work per week.

There are plenty of job vacancies available that allow employees to take their own horse with them to the job. Many employers will accommodate a horse free of charge, others will charge a livery fee – discuss this with a potential employer when searching for Apprentice Groom Vacancies for your child, and ensure the financial aspects are detailed in your child’s Written Statement of Employment Particulars.

Yes. Many Equine Apprentice vacancies are “live in” jobs. However, if a child is under 18 years of age the employer must seek the parent’s/guardian’s written consent for the child to live away from home.

Yes, but there are no guarantees that individual vacancies will still be open by the time your child is available to start the job. Stay in touch with any employers your child is in conversation with, and contact us with any queries and for guidance throughout your child’s job seeking process.

Yes. Because an Apprentice is an official employment status, all employment laws apply, including the requirement to be issued a Written Statement of Employment Particulars (the “employment contract”) within 2 months of starting work.

No. An Apprentice is an official employment status and all employment laws are applicable to the job role.

No. Either employee or employer can give notice in the normal way for any employment situation. Your child’s apprenticeship can be transferred to a different employer and the employer can replace your child with a new employee.

Add a Jobseekers Profile to The Apprentice Grooms Directory

Add a Jobseekers Profile to The Grooms List Apprentice Grooms Directory – completely free of charge! Search, save, and apply for jobs whenever you like from any device, even your mobile phone. Set up Job Alerts and receive an email each time a new job is added that meets your requirements. Contact us for advice at any time throughout your job hunt.

Who are we and why use us to find an Apprenticeship?

Employing an Apprentice Groom
The Grooms List by Caroline Carter Recruitment is invested in the Grooms of the Future via Apprenticeships.

  • We regularly work with Apprenticeship providers who deliver world-class Apprenticeship programmes via a highly experienced team of trainers/coaches who can deliver a comprehensive range of equine apprenticeships for all ages and levels of experience.
  • With established relationships with employers and job seekers alike, we are the go-to recruitment advisers in both the UK and overseas for all levels of yard and budgets.
  • We offer one-to-one, impartial, no-obligation careers and recruitment advice to job seekers throughout their equine career, from finding their very first job, building their CV, making the right moves at the right time.

Further reading

The “Written Statement of Employment Particulars” explained

A “Written Statement of Employment Particulars” is the part of an employment contract that has to be given in writing within two months of an employee starting work, and both employers and employees need to know what it must contain and what it can contain. Make sure you know where you stand!

What happens when a job offer is withdrawn?

Offering and accepting a job offer can be a time of mixed emotions – happiness, relief, anxiety, and even confusion in some circumstances. But occasionally things go wrong when they’ve barely begun and the job offer is withdrawn. Where do employers and job seekers stand when a job offer/acceptance is withdrawn?

Employment contracts in the equine industry

There is often much confusion about employment contracts in the equine industry, and it’s very easy for both employers and grooms to make mistakes that, in the worst case scenario, can be devastating further on in time. Read our simple guide and make sure you’re in the know and on the right side of the law when it comes to employment contracts.

Making and accepting a job offer – the do’s and don’ts!

Sometimes, making and accepting a job offer can be somewhat rushed and not treated with the formality it really does require. Whilst it’s a huge relief to have reached this stage, it is by no means the end of the process! There is still time for things to unravel and go wrong, and sometimes badly wrong, which it’s why it’s so important for both employers and job seekers to approach this stage with care and to put aside a little quality time to get it spot-on! Read our guidance on making and accepting a formal job offer…

Brexit – Information for Employers and Grooms in the Equine Industry

As we fast approach 29th March 2019 when the UK leaves the European Union, “Brexit” dominates our news headlines daily but it can be extremely hard to keep up with, let alone understand what is happening and what to expect. As an international recruitment agency, we place many British Grooms in jobs within the EU, and many EU citizens into jobs within the UK, so… what about information for Employers and Grooms in the equine industry?

4 common pitfalls when employing staff and how to avoid them!

This week’s blog is for all those interested in knowing more about the facts concerning employee wages, accommodation charges, holiday entitlements and finally sick pay, income tax, national insurance and pensions.

Linda Hudson, Head of Business Development at Educ8 Training, has in the last 10 years worked in both college and private training organisations and rather usefully, has also studied employment law. Linda now kindly offers us all a short review with some handy hints, tips and links for good measure!

Equine Jobs with Accommodation

The provision of accommodation with an equine job can be a grey area for both employers and employees, with so many varying arrangements from yard to yard and job role to job role. Get it wrong and at the very least an employer struggles to find and keep staff, the employee loses out on their salary entitlement and, worst case scenario, the employer and employee find themselves in very hot water. Here we attempt to put a complex matter into as simple terms as possible, regarding the provision of accommodation with a job, based on situations regularly seen within the equine industry.

5 reasons why the equine industry needs Apprentice Grooms!

It’s National Apprentice Week 4th March – 8th March 2019 – a perfect time for grooms to explore the possibilities of gaining nationally recognised qualifications without having to take time out from work, and employers to consider expanding their team by taking on an apprentice groom! Why is this so important to the equine industry? Because the equine industry NEEDS you to! Before dismissing the idea of becoming or employing an apprentice, read our 5 reasons why the equine industry needs Apprentice Grooms…

Equine Apprenticeships: Course Options – Grooms of the Future Part 2

Looking to build a successful career in a particular discipline or sector of the equine industry? Find out about the course options available to learners via and equine apprenticeship.

Equine Apprenticeships – invaluable education or slave labour?

Fresh from the clutches of 11 years enforced education, drunk on your own freedom (honestly guv I’m just really happy), the prospect of earning a proper wage dangled in front of you tantalisingly, it can be tough persuading yourself to think long-term about career planning. The prospect of returning to a classroom for college courses or perhaps a degree holds no appeal for those who struggle with formal education or are just fed up with the confinement of a classroom. Apprenticeships provide an alternative way to achieve formal, industry recognised City and Guilds qualifications with minimum or possibly even no classroom time. Learners are able to ‘earn while they learn’ as the tagline goes. The equine industry is famously fast-paced and physical, and there is unanimous thinking when it comes to the verdict that there is really no substitute for practical, on the job training. An equine Apprenticeship allows you to gain this in an unexploited, structured and planned way whilst also gaining the piece of paper to prove it. Becky Parker discusses the pros, cons and alternative routes into a successful career with horses.

Employing an Apprentice Groom – Grooms of the Future Part 1

Trainee grooms, including apprentices, are a lifeblood of our industry and the ins and outs of employing them needs much more consideration than they currently get – the yard junior, the trainee and of course the official and safeguarded version of the working pupil, the apprentice groom, are the future. What we all invest today could reverse the sometimes depressing current trends in the industry for tomorrow. If you are sitting comfortably with a large glass/cup of whatever keeps you awake and concentrating, please do read on. We hope you will be glad you did and that you will share this info to anyone you think might benefit from it –  THE EQUESTRIAN INDUSTRY DESPERATELY NEEDS PEOPLE LIKE YOU!

Equine Apprenticeship Myths – BUSTED!

The Grooms List by Caroline Carter Recruitment Ltd is delighted to publish this article by equine apprenticeship expert Linda Hudson, busting some common myths that often stop employers, would-be apprentices, and even parents from considering an equine apprenticeship.

A step by step guide to becoming an Apprentice Groom

Everyone likes to keep things simple, and sometimes gathering all the information needed before making decisions and acting on them can be time-consuming. With this in mind, The Grooms List team have put together a simple step-by-step guide to becoming an Apprentice Groom, from finding your Apprentice Groom vacancy to your options once you’ve gained your qualification.

How an Equine Apprenticeship can benefit your child

As specialist equine recruitment consultants, we see the good and bad outcomes of unstructured career pathways and the results of the “rooky errors” young people make without correct guidance. We’re passionate about the part we can play in improving the role of an equine groom as a credible career pathway and we’ll always do our utmost to encourage your child to make safe career decisions.

Many young people wishing to work in the equine industry will make a blind leap into it by accepting the first job available to them. Needless to say, this isn’t always a constructive foundation for a fruitful career in the equine industry. Many grooms resort to “job-hopping” in search of the training and opportunities they crave, without realising the damaging effect this has on their CV and future career prospects.

By contrast, an Equine Apprenticeship makes the job seeker focus on what they would like to achieve within their career and how they can achieve it. The job seeker can then source meaningful employment as an Apprentice Groom, enabling them to earn while they learn, laying the foundation of a promising career – and ultimately become one of the best professional grooms in the equine industry.

How an Apprentice Groom can benefit YOUR yard

In so many of the blogs and articles we write for equine employers, we find ourselves referring to common difficulties when sourcing, securing and retaining good equine career grooms. It’s reasonable to conclude the pool of experienced grooms wanting to remain working with horses and available to yards is diminishing as the years pass. Trainee grooms, including apprentices, are a lifeblood of the equine industry and the ins and outs of employing them need much more consideration than they currently get.

Taking anyone on as an employee is a big responsibility with plenty of legislation to adhere to along associated pitfalls, so it’s very tempting to aim to keep things simple by seeking to only take on employees with experience and a solid employment history. Not only could you find this attempt to keep things simple actually complicates your recruitment drive, as you struggle to attract and secure established, experienced career grooms in what is undeniably a very competitive recruitment market for employers, but by shunning the notion of taking on an apprentice, quite simply, you could be missing out!

How an Apprenticeship can benefit your equine career

As specialist equine recruitment consultants, we see the good and bad outcomes of unstructured career pathways and the results of the “rooky errors” grooms make without correct guidance. We’re passionate about the part we can play in improving the role of an equine groom as a credible career pathway.

Many equestrians join the equine industry by making a blind leap into it, accepting the first job available to them. Needless to say, this isn’t a constructive foundation for a fruitful career in the equine industry. Many grooms resort to “job-hopping” in search of the training and opportunities they crave, without realising the damaging effect this has on their CV and future career prospects.

By contrast, an Equine Apprenticeship makes the you focus on what you would like to achieve within your career and how you can achieve it. You can then source meaningful employment as an Apprentice Groom, enabling you to earn while you learn, laying the foundation of a promising career – and ultimately become one of the best professional grooms in the equine industry.

A step by step guide to employing an Apprentice Groom

Everyone likes to keep things simple, and sometimes gathering all the information needed before making decisions and acting on them can be time-consuming. With this in mind, The Grooms List team have put together a simple step-by-step guide to employing an Apprentice Groom, from writing your advert to retaining your fully trained Apprentice Groom beyond their final qualification.

What is a Workplace Pension?

Since April 2017, it’s compulsory that all eligible employees receive a Workplace Pension as part of their employment contract, and this applies to grooms working in the equine industry. There is still a lot of confusion surrounding Workplace Pensions, who is eligible for one and who should be paying into one. So, what is a workplace pension? What does this mean? Who should expect to receive one? We have put together a simple guide to answer 10 common questions regarding Workplace Pensions in the equine industry

Understanding Holiday Entitlement in the Equine Industry

We all know horses don’t look after themselves, and it appears that this may lead to some confusion at times regarding holiday entitlement in the equine industry. Whether you’re an employer or an employee, don’t make assumptions about holiday entitlement, make sure you know the law!

The difference between employed, self-employed and freelance grooms

The legal requirements which underpin being self-employed vs employed are vast but not as complicated as you might originally have thought. Here at The Grooms List by Caroline Carter Recruitment Ltd, we don’t pretend to be legal, tax or HR experts on the nuances that surround this subject, but we know people who are and with their expert guidance, Becky Parker our brilliant blog writer has researched that for your information this week. We proudly support Grooms who are looking for full-time employment, those self-employed/freelancing and looking to add clients to their portfolio, or indeed just starting out on either road and wondering how best to proceed. We really can and regularly do help and have many success stories that attest to that. We wouldn’t direct anyone to go one way or another specifically as it is a very personal to each individual.

The National Minimum Wage and Living Wage

In April every year, at the end of one Tax Year and the start of the next, the National Minimum Wage and Living Wage increases. This is important for everyone in the equine industry – employers and employees alike. Equestrianism is a notoriously low-pay industry in terms of hourly salary, and salaries are frequently, if not always, topped up with extras, bonuses and tidbits. But in reality, how lawful are we in doing this without the advice and guidance of accountants and tax specialists? And what are the consequences of getting it wrong? The UK Government has strict laws regarding the minimum sum of money any individual can receive in return for work done and it can be confusing at least, a minefield at worst, when remunerating staff not just fairly, but legally too.  In this article, I asked guest blogger Kelly Wallace Horne to take a timely look, and research answers to basic questions for both employers and employees regarding the National Minimum Wage and Living Wage and to highlight common misconceptions within the equine industry regarding wages, remuneration packages and the law.

The Ultimate Equestrian Apprentice Startup Kit

My name is Olivia Alstad. I’m a Canadian rider who moved to the UK to train and learn more about the sport of eventing. With no plan or education on the apprenticeship scheme, I made all the rookie errors! I’ve written an article to help you in your pursuit of a suitable apprenticeship, avoiding all the major mistakes that I made!

5 reasons why Apprentice Grooms are always #winning

You may not realise it, but Apprentice Grooms are always winning! Whether you’re a school-leaver looking to forge a successful career in the equine industry or an established groom who would like formal recognition of your abilities with qualifications, an equine apprenticeship will be an almost surefire way of achieving your goals…

5 Major differences between horses as a hobby and as a career!

They say “choose a career you love and you’ll never work a day in your life”, and for a lot of horse lovers a career in the equine industry would be a dream come true. But how different is working with horses to keeping them as a hobby?

Choosing the RIGHT apprenticeship training provider

All apprenticeships are supported by a specialist training organisation and choosing the right apprenticeship training provider is hugely important to a success outcome for both the learner and the employer. Here we offer employers some tips and advice on finding and selecting the right apprenticeship training provider for your yard.

Why The Grooms List is THE GO-TO place for Equine Apprenticeships

It’s National Apprentice Week 4th March – 8th March 2019 – a perfect time for grooms to explore the possibilities of gaining nationally recognised qualifications without having to take time out from work, and employers to consider expanding their team by taking on an apprentice groom! Whether you’re an employer or a learner/would be apprentice The Grooms List by Caroline Carter Recruitment is THE GO-TO place to go for Equine Apprenticeships! Everything both employers and learners need is here, in one place, from choosing a Training Provider to finding your next groom or job and everything in between!

A Basic Guide to Payslips

Understanding payslips is easier than you might think. From the 6th April 2019, it is an employee’s statutory right to receive a payslip, so it’s important that everyone understands them! Unless you are genned up on the ins and outs of gross salary, income tax, allowances, Workplace Pensions and National Insurance it may look like a confusing bunch of numbers, especially if you’re a worker receiving payslips for the first time. In this article we give you a basic guide to payslips, from who should be given payslips and why, through to understanding the various codes and figures.

Pre-Employment Checks – References

As we all know, recruitment is an inexact science and pre-employment checks such as securing valid and recent references gives us important information that helps us to decide if a candidate is suitable for a particular role.

Over the years I have taken references on behalf of thousands of employers and prospective employees as part of delivering bespoke recruitment services. This has lead me to have many positive, long-term placements and via the same established processes of due diligence, I have also diverted my clients away from certain disaster on more than one occasion!

Interestingly these days many grooms, having known me through their careers, give me as a reference to their ‘journey.’  Similarly, and not infrequently, employers will ask me for information about a particular prospective employee and of course, where I can fairly and legally comment, I do.

Over the years, more especially in the equestrian recruitment environment, I have been struck by how many employers who recruit for themselves or via other routes don’t seem to bother taking up references, opting instead to completely ignore these critical pre-employment checks just hoping for the best; many seem to live to regret this omission sooner or later…

Information

Caroline Carter Recruitment Ltd
The Stables
Fildyke Road
Meppershall
Bedfordshire
SG17 5LU

caroline@carolinecarterrecruitment.com
0203 006 5730 / 07747 686 118

Registered company number 10657796good site
Caroline Carter Recruitment Ltd is registered with the UK Information Commissioner as a data controller with registered number ZA250621

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